JR JR’s Josh Epstein’s Mental Health Awareness Month Playlist

I enjoyed the Billboard article written by Patrick Crowley where Detroit duo, JR JR are highlighted, and Josh Epstein discusses why the band chose to take part of their earnings from their tour and donate them to the Jed Foundation to help with mental health and suicide prevention for young adults and youth. 

Epstein created a Mental Health Awareness playlist on Billboard’s Spotify account, and then shares why he selected some of the songs. It’s an eclectic list and in my opinion does show the spectrum of the highs, lows, struggles and victories faced by those who knowingly and unknowingly battle mental health issues. 

Check out the article and the playlist here: 

http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/lifestyle/7777031/takeover-tuesday-jr-jr-mental-health-awareness-month-exclusive-interview-playlist-spotify

Reflecting on the Orlando Shaw’s, Shawty Lo’s, Video Vixens, and Reality Stars of this Country: We Need a Wakeup Call.

By Natasha L. Foreman, MBA

I am blown away by our society, especially here in the United States. I feel like someone sucker-punched me and I’m left gasping for air in desperation every time I read, see, or hear news about a person acting a complete fool one way or another—-especially when it’s a person of color. I say this because there is a stigma associated with so-called minorities. Think of the various stereotypes you have bought into about Asians, Latinos, Blacks, those from the Middle East, and others with darker skin pigmentation. Now multiply that exposure by millions, and we then are left with millions of people thinking the same thing about these racial groups.

So imagine how it feels to turn on the news, open the newspaper, or read an online article about so-called men who also happen to be Black who walk around thinking it’s okay to impregnate dozens of women (who already have low self-esteem and dignity) but they don’t take care of the children that they help to bring into the world. Can you say Shawty Lo and Orlando Shaw?

Imagine how a person’s stomach turns to see children walking around with little to no exposure or interaction with the “men” who helped to bring them into this world. Imagine the disgust of knowing that the money that comes into each of those households is being provided by our tax dollars through the state, and not by these so-called “men” who want to be called “daddy”.

Take it all in as you visualize how these children with poor role models will eventually grow up, and how they will impact our neighborhoods, country, and the world.

Now let me just zoom in and focus on Black people, since the article that I’m about to reference is addressing a deadbeat dad who also happens to be Black.

Our world has a stereotypical image of the Black man. He is loud, angry, violent, ignorant, lazy, has low IQ, good at sports, physically strong, extremely high sex drive, and has a well-endowed sexual organ.

Our world has a stereotypical image of the Black woman. She is loud, angry, violent, ignorant, lazy, has a low IQ, good at sports, good at gyrating her hips while dancing proactively, extremely high sex drive, and has a big rear end that she likes to parade around for the world to see.

And some Black men and women are, “attractive for a Black person”. I will let that marinate in your mind and gut for a bit.

Depictions of Black people are always conflicting as in the same breath a Black person could be called both lazy and a hard worker, violent and nurturing, one who can’t be trusted yet also dependable and loyal, great at sports but not smart enough or talented enough to be in the celebrated role of quarterback, pitcher, coach, general manager, or owner. With all of these conflicting terms and depictions floating around, the likelihood is extremely high that these negative portrayals are deeply embedded in the minds of those being stereotyped. If you hear something long enough and hear no counter-argument refuting the claim, you may begin believing what is said about you. If enough people tell you that you are dumb or ugly, then you may begin seeing yourself that way, and eventually acting that way.

This isn’t the case just for Black people, it’s all of us. What about the Asian who makes average or below average grades but has been historically stereotyped as brilliant, what happens to their psyche when they experience this conflict? What about Latinos who are devalued and seen as only laborers and always perceived to not know how to speak English, so how could they possibly compete with the masses? Our once-beloved Middle Easterners now have a “terrorist” label attached to them. What does all of this do to the minds of the people who are subjected to this negative talk and portrayal of them?

Why are we not surprised that people go to the extremes, either trying to be accepted through assimilation or trying to separate themselves completely using terror as their weapon. Think about it, a gang is an organization that takes in those who don’t feel loved, valued, appreciated, understood, powerful, or protected. They need counseling and better role models. Just as anyone willing to change their name, get plastic surgery, and bleach their skin to appear more white and accepted, needs counseling and better role models.

Let’s look at something shall we?

Circa 1989 the music and film industries began cranking out songs and movies about gangs, marijuana and other drugs, including alcohol. Now everyone seems to be a thug, gangsta, getting high, drunk, selling drugs, or getting busted with them. From 1970 to 2007 we had the highest incarceration of Black males, yet no one has rang the bell of enlightenment for the masses to hear and identify with this reality that the more Black males who get busted for possession leaves more women and children alone to fend for themselves, and live off of state assistance provided by our tax dollars. Nope, folks keep gang banging, drinking in excess and getting high on their own supply or someone else’s, and then wondering what happened to their lives after getting locked up or serving a life sentence due to HIV/AIDS, etc.

Then around 2003 I started hearing more and more songs about strippers and models, and I had the nerve to be shocked to see thousands of young ladies desiring to be strippers and models. Shouldn’t I have expected to see young girls and women smacking their butt cheeks and dropping it like it’s hot, while posing for pictures that would be used for club flyers, magazines, and the like? Shouldn’t I have expected to see females rushing to casting calls for music videos so they could work those hips and cute faces for $50 on average per day? Shouldn’t I have expected to see oiled up females sliding down stripper poles twisting their bodies like pretzels hoping, wishing, and praying that they can leave that night with more than $50 and sore feet?

Don’t get me wrong I used to want to be a model, and even took some shots for a portfolio when I was 18, but it was short-lived because I took the time to learn the business and realized that my looks would only last so long and then what would I do? Lord knows I wasn’t willing to go to the extremes to be discovered and represented, and I wasn’t going to have an eating disorder or sample drugs to stay thin and pubescent looking for designers. But the vast majority of females don’t put that much thought into it. No, instead they see themselves as beautiful and gorgeous, one of a kind, and far prettier than the rest, and then convince themselves that they are deserving of a Tyra Banks and Naomi Campbell salary and lifestyle right now.

Instead of being ticked off by the songs that encouraged men to go to strip clubs, and celebrated the gyrating strippers, females felt empowered by the songs, music videos, and magazine articles to showcase their bodies for the world to see, with hopes of being labeled the next video vixen, top model, or baddest b****. I’m not sure how they thought the top agencies would look past their “hood” portraits and showcases at the Big Booty Tavern (gosh, I hope that’s not a real strip club name). Why would a top agency want to contract with the girl bent over the hood of a deuce and a quarter wearing a thong and six inch heels? How could that agency conceivably market this girl to their biggest clients? How could they cross platforms? It’s hard enough breaking into modeling and acting as a Black woman, a resume filled with stripping and booty shots won’t make it any easier. But this logic isn’t running through the minds of the girls and young women who have ambitious dreams of being rich and famous.

Now let me broaden this discussion beyond Black people, although they are still part of this conversation (but definitely not alone).

We have seen people dying like flies behind cases of HIV, AIDS, and other sexually-transmitted diseases, yet people are still less inclined to invest a couple of bucks in a condom, and get free screening two times per year. We know that birth control works 90-99.9% of the time when used correctly, and we also know that there are a lot of free and low cost clinics around this country that will provide birth control to males and females who know they are in no position to bring a child into this world. Yet, we keep seeing the babies popping out left and right. We keep seeing folks who are bound for the Jerry Springer and Maury Povich type shows. We keep seeing more and more reality TV shows that were supposed to help slow down teen pregnancy rates, somehow get hoodwinked in a reverse psychology where more teens find it cute to walk around playing house after barely hitting puberty.

These aren’t just Black people doing these things, nope this ignorance covers the rainbow spectrum across these good ole’ United States. The talk shows have representatives from every racial group in the U.S. and the reality shows focused on teen pregnancy have roughly a 90% makeup of white teens starring on the show and as viewers.

I’m saddened, disgusted, enraged, and embarrassed!

Awhile ago I remember hearing about Orlando Shaw, the Black male (not a man by any decent human being’s standards) who thought it was cool that he impregnated 14 women and had 22 children by them. I almost swerved off the road in utter disbelief as I heard the ignorant ramblings coming from his mouth through my car radio. He had little regard or concern about those 36 lives he has now negatively impacted. Yes, 36 lives.

The 14 young women who obviously think their value rests between their legs and not in their heads. These women who obviously also don’t have strong, positive female (and mother) role models in their lives, for if they did they would never subject their children or themselves to the madness that they are currently facing and the darkness that is around the corner. For those women who have more than one child with Orlando Shaw aka the “sperm donor” (my name for him) they will feel less inclined to pull themselves out of this dark pit he has helped place them in, and instead they will settle with trying to survive in what they depressingly consider “comfortable”, living off of the Tennessee taxpayers, and letting Orlando come over whenever he wants to get some “lovin'”.

Then there’s the 22 precious and innocent children who will most likely grow up with the image of Orlando as their example of a man, daddy, and father. If he has daughters, they will spend most or all of their lives looking for “daddy” in every male they encounter, and settling for “baby daddies” over husbands, and any sons that he helped produce will spend most or all of their lives following their sperm donor’s footsteps, broke, jobless, and treating women like human receptacles. That is unless there is a major intervention that can thwart this outcome, and I mean a major intervention!

Well Orlando Shaw has popped back on my radar again this morning as I surfed through my online news sources. Dr. Boyce Watkins has written a piece updating us on the latest pimp network supporting Orlando’s baby making spree. Ole’ Orlando is slated to get his own reality show supposedly to help pay off his child support debt. Now Orlando has chosen not to work, not to help his children financially, and the TV network and Shaw want you and I to believe that he has every intention of taking this money and taking care of his 22 kids!

Really?

Here’s the deal, his ignorance will be watched like a hawk because the world loves to gawk over the buffoonery, bloops, blunders, and misery of others. We absolutely get a thrill out of watching people fall, get hit, make a fool of themselves, and scream out in pain. Our society loves to see someone worse off than we are. Someone else’s pain is our pleasure. So people will tune in to the world of Orlando Shaw and the TV network will make millions of dollars exploiting Orlando, the women, and the innocent children. Even if the contract between Orlando and the network states that a portion of the money will be withheld and allocated for child support administration, where’s the allocation to go towards counseling and other support needs that these women and children will need? And what about the counseling Orlando needs?

There is no doubt about it that this image he wants to portray as a self-proclaimed “Romeo” (his word not mine) is all a shell for the insecure child that hides inside of him scared to stand up and be a man. For this child known as Orlando Shaw, impregnating females is merely a game, and the easiest way for him to claim manhood besides the age listed on his state identification card. Orlando and the women who have been forced to be caretakers need psychological help, job and career training, financial dignity training, parenting courses, and a laundry list of other sources—-that Orlando’s network deal should pay for. Orlando needs to learn the family structure and his role in it, and that his children are not his “siblings”, yes you read that correctly, Orlando continues to refer to his children as his “siblings”. You shouldn’t laugh at that, it should disturb the mess out of you!

Those 22 children need counseling, access to support groups and mentors, tutors and after school resources. Those children need access to men and women who can show them that their current state of living does not have to be their long-term reality. Yes, the TV network that wants to exploit and pimp them should pay for that also. But here’s the thing, what about our responsibility and culpability in all of this?

When will we get tired of celebrating ignorance and buffoonery? When will we say, “no more” to these reality shows that are laughably unreal, scripted, and geared towards dumbing down people and highlighting the ignorance of others? Every time you tune in to one of these shows you are making the executives behind the cameras richer and wealthier. Every time you tune in you are helping to pay someone’s mortgage, sending their children to expensive colleges and universities, paying for lavish vacations, and helping to improve their lifestyle. But how’s your life?

How’s the lives of these so-called “reality stars” who are being rationed out small morsels of money compared to the network executives? Have you noticed that a vast majority of reality stars end up strung out on drugs and alcohol, or arrested for something crazy? Then they are geared up and propped up for a star appearance on a celebrity intervention or rehab show. Our society enjoys dragging people through the mud and watching them self-destruct on TV, the Internet, and in tabloids.

Do we not care about these individuals? Do we not care about how this negative influence will impact their families and generations to come? Do we not see how this negative impact then affects each and every one of us? Whether we get hit with taxes to pay for their children, pay for their time in jail or prison, or for some other situation, we too are negatively impacted by the decisions these folks are making. The drunk driver, the mugger, car jacker, robber, rapist, suicide victim, or even the person living out on that sidewalk—-they could be one of these people (or their children) one day. Do we turn a blind eye? Do we ignore it until we are a direct victim? How can their problem, their illness, not be an issue of concern for you?

As long as there are stereotypes, discrimination, racism, and a slanted justice system we all are impacted by the images and actions of others. As long as there are stereotypes, discrimination, racism, and a slanted justice system we all are susceptible to buying in, exploiting, and being exploited by others. As long as we are comfortable being ignorant we will continue to be treated and regarded as ignorant. Other countries laugh at us and I can see why. The most powerful and wealthiest nation in the world, looks down upon others, but has a glass house with holes and cracks so big that planes can fly through, and we keep hoping that no intense storms shatters our glass house. We are quick to judge other nations, but let’s look inward at our own. Yes, our country is great and far better than others, but we could be better—-and if we are to lead the world then we must lead by example—and not with a “do as I say not as I do” mantra.

It should not be a first or second thought of “I can just get state assistance” when contemplating pregnancy, not when our country has so many options and resources to prevent pregnancy and to give every citizen and resident a chance at living a dignified life as a hard-working contributor through employment, business ownership, etc. We need to help our children and young adults to see the positive role models in the country, around the world, and most importantly in their neighborhoods. Let’s not just clothe them and feed their stomachs, let’s feed their minds with relevant topics and subjects, and show them the possibilities for today and tomorrow. No more pipe dreams, just dreams and goals with trackable benchmarks.

Let’s show them how to be bonafide (and legal) entrepreneurs at the age of 8-20. Let’s show them how to apply for grants and scholarships, how to save and invest money, how to walk with dignity, and how to rebuild and protect their neighborhoods while also being concerned about other neighborhoods. Let’s show them how to respect and care for our elders and our parents. Let’s show them how a weapon isn’t necessary to settle a disagreement, and how fighting doesn’t solve anything (and usually causes a domino effect called revenge). Let’s show them that bullies are bullied, and how to help squash bullying and how to get help for both sets of victims. Let’s teach them that their bodies and sexual organs are not to be exploited and broadcasted for others enjoyment. Let’s teach them the beauty of marriage and that it is to be entered by two people in love, who vow to work through thick and thin for the rest of their lives as a team—not entered into like a dance competition that when one misses a step you instantly break up the team and go separate ways.

Just as they need to stop relying on the government to take care of them, we need to stop relying on and waiting for the government (or self-designated “leaders”) to clean up our mess. We created it or watched it happen so we need to clean it up, one home at a time, one street at a time, one neighborhood and city at a time, until we reclaim our beautiful country and restore it to where we all wished it to be when we were small children—-safe, loving, caring, considerate, dignified, respected and respectful, forgiving, embracing, honorable, open-minded, receptive, compassionate, accepting, and tolerant.

If you would like to read Dr. Boyce Watkins post about Orlando Shaw and the state of America, and Black America, read more here:

http://naturallymoi.com/2013/07/news/man-with-22-kids-by-14-women-may-get-his-own-reality-show/

Share with me your thoughts on my article and Dr. Watkin’s article. What do you think that you could do to help reverse the negativity in our neighborhoods and throughout our country? What are you willing to do today to help right these wrongs? What are you already doing to bring about positive change in your community, state, and for the broader good of our nation? I would love to hear from you. We have to be the change that we want to see.

~Natasha

Copyright 2013. Natasha L. Foreman. All Rights Reserved.

Black Men and Suicide

By Natasha L. Foreman, MBA

I just read a very interesting article that was published last month online by Dr. O about Black men and suicide.

There was an emotional video that accompanied it, showing the dramatized story of one young man who contemplated suicide because he thought life’s pressures were too much, and that the dream path his mother encouraged him to follow (education and career) would be easier to attain, and brightly lit, when his perception of his reality was completely different.

I don’t want to spoil it for you, you have to watch it for yourself and share with others.

This short film clip and Dr. O’s article touches on a poignant fact that mental health professionals attempt to get all of us to learn and understand; that although we may be products of our parents, we are not them.

So no matter if they abandoned us, committed suicide, were/are abusive or addicts, WE don’t have to follow their paths or the decisions they made. But many people, including Black men struggle with this (especially when outside forces are telling them the opposite) and instead fall deeper into their depression.

According to Dr. Sherry Molock, Psychology Professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C. and Director of Clinical Training for the University’s Psychology Department, poverty and unemployment contribute to the increase of suicide among Black men. Dr. Molock was quoted as saying, “Some of the men I work with have no hope for the future; they simply live day by day.”

To add to this point, Dr. O quoted
Reverend Cecil L. Murray, former pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles as saying, “Despair is increasing, and that despair is economic, political, educational, and social.”

Reverend Murray also spoke of the broken home in the Black community and that young adult males are, “left without a hands-on mentor. Also recall that the divorce rate is 50%; the rate of birth out of wedlock approaches 75% in impoverished communities, so the wheel of difficulty keeps spinning more rapidly.”

Dr. O posed six theories that he presented for this dilemma:

1. Learned Helplessness (major theory of depression)

2. Primitive Rage and Abandonment Anger (abandoned by either one or both parents so males give up on life)

3. Financial Stress (no jobs for uneducated Black men; which means you can’t provide for yourself or your family)

4. Unresolved Early Childhood Abuse (unresolved verbal, emotional, physical, and/or sexual abuse endured by males and/or females)

5. Chronic Medical Problems
(no health insurance means no regular check ups, which means a higher probability of disease)

6. Chronic Mental Health Problems (no health insurance means no access to professionals who can evaluate and treat mental health issues including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc.)

Dr. O goes into further detail what these six theories mean exactly, and then goes further into the exploration of suicide prevention, intervention, and five points to ponder about depression and suicide.

To read the article in its entirety and to view the video visit:

http://www.askdro.com/2012/03/black-men-and-suicide-enough-said/

Please share this post with others you know; depression, suicide, abuse, and other issues are considered taboo in the Black community, so many of us refuse to discuss the things that haunt and sometimes kill us.

Copyright 2012. Natasha L. Foreman. Some Rights Reserved.

What Brought Her to Jump?

It brings me such pain to think of this young woman, any woman, any person taking their life. It hurts to think of all of the possibilities that laid before her. It saddens me to think of how far she traveled, how much she endured to reach the young age of 25, thousands of miles away from her birthplace, her home where some of her family still resides. I wonder why? I wonder where her family, friends, and mentors were while she contemplated how she would see her last day. To think of their last conversation with her is chilling. I wonder why there wasn’t ‘enough’ in life to be enough for her to want to live.

The young woman I am speaking of, the “her”, is Dr. Tosin Oyelowo, a graduate of the University of Charleston West Virginia School of Pharmacy, and a first-year pharmacology student at the Medical University of South Carolina. Tosin traveled all the way from Lagos, Nigeria with her family to attend school in the U.S. with dreams, goals, and ambitions of becoming an honorable and successful doctor.

Tosin Oyelowo--A Bright Star Gone Too Soon

Her focus was on doing good and helping others, so what shifted in her life and thinking to make her want to hijack and sabotage her legacy?

What made this young, bright light decide to jump from the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in to South Carolina’s Cooper River?

The blog her family created when she first was reported missing has now been removed: http://drtosinoyelowofamily.wordpress.com/2011/12/17/hello-world/ and her pharmacy school profile is also no longer available for review: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/pharmacy_services/residency/residents/2011_12/oyelowo.html a sign that although her body has not been found, they believe that she has already passed and transitioned on to her next level of existence.

Do we not recognize a troubled soul that needs help? Do we not stop and ask how we can help, how we can minimize the pain and the struggle that they are trying to endure? What about us? Are we letting our support system know that we are worn out, losing hope, low on faith, and struggling to get up each day? Are we effectively communicating that we need help, that we need guidance, and that we need more support?

Is our desire for success, for achieving greatness, and for doing it before old age, also a potential detonator for an emotional bomb that sets us off to harm ourselves or others? Are we trying to numb and distract ourselves with drugs, alcohol, sex, technology, and other vices? Is suicide one of the possible outcomes when numbing no longer works?

I wonder what Tosin attempted to do to help alleviate her troubles, solve her problems, and bring her joy. I wonder if the same thought she had when driving to the bridge and standing on that ledge is the same once she let go and jumped. Did it bring her peace? I pray that she is at peace. I pray that her family and friends heal from the pain they are feeling right now. I pray that any guilt they may feel dries up and washes away. I pray that their hearts remain warm with memories of Tosin. I hope that her shortened life has a legacy beyond these days, to help those who are in need the most…to help those Tosin dreamed of serving.

To read the article about Tosin Oyelowo visit:
http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/bridge-jumper-identified-as-tosin-oyelowo/Content?oid=3662179

For a listing of suicide hotlines throughout the U.S. visit: http://suicidehotlines.com

To learn more about suicide prevention and depression awareness visit: http://www.save.org

Copyright 2012. Natasha L. Foreman. All Rights Reserved.

Forgiveness is for the Forgiver More Than for the Forgiven

By Natasha L. Foreman, MBA

I have had the opportunity recently to forgive some people in my life who wronged me over the years. I had forgiven them already, but I guess for them, it was necessary to ask…and in some cases, this was not the first request. In all relationships- business and personal I believe that when we part ways, even on bad terms, you should still forgive the person that you believe wronged you. It’s not so much for them as it is for you. This is your opportunity to leave the past in the past, release the weight you have been carrying around on your shoulders and in your heart, and free yourself from the venom inside that causes you to roll your eyes and suck your teeth every time you think of them.

So a few years ago I walked away from a personal relationship. I had forgiven that person for misleading me, betraying me, and mistreating me. I forgave that person for not treating me with the respect that I deserved- that I had given him. He thought money and gifts were good enough, and they would make me overlook his indiscretions in our relationship. He thought that material possessions and a ‘status’ and ‘title’ excused his behavior and treatment of me. He thought that telling me lies and misleading me were excusable offenses because he was, “a man” and “men will be men”, and some other nonsense.

He forgot he was playing games with a child of God. He also forgot my clear declaration that I shared with him, and every man before and after him…”Be honest and upfront. If you want to see other people then let’s just casually date, so we can both be free to date others” because “Once I’m through I’m through, there are no re-takes, breaks while we figure things out, or break-ups to make-ups…if you cheat I’m gone….”

But what was I thinking? Women didn’t leave him, he left them, so I was obviously delusional and way in over my head in his opinion.

It would appear that he was actually the delusional one. Once I walked away from the relationship there was no looking back, no holding on to memories and hopes for something more with him. No desire to punish him, get even, or parade around him and his friends as a reminder of what he had and lost. I was at peace. I had already moved on before I made the decision to say, “this isn’t working out.” But to have this overwhelming sense of peace and resolve it required me to forgive him, which I did.

Years have passed and it never crossed my mind that this individual would spend the time and resources to track me down to ask for forgiveness. But he did. So once again I forgave him. No emotion, no questions of why, how, and “what did I do to you to make you think I deserved this?” Instead, I calmly and rationally told him that I forgave him years ago, have no interest on rekindling flames or even being friends. I wished him well in life and said a quick prayer hoping he receives the life he has always wanted, and that it falls in line with what God believes he needs.

For him he felt he needed clarification; he needed to know how I knew he was cheating because he had been so careful; he needed to know if we could be friends (I guess he thought the first time I said “no” it was a typo), and if we could meet up from time to time. Quickly, clearly, and succinctly I explained the following…

I knew he was cheating because I pray throughout the day every day that God always reveals the truth to me and never allows me to be hidden from it or blind-sided by it; I told him that he should never attempt to mislead or battle with a ‘believer’ because no weapon formed against us shall ever prosper. I firmly yet respectfully told him again that he had no reason to contact me after that point, that if he has learned from his past and has no intention on repeating it then it’s time for him to move on and learn his next lesson.

Had I still been carrying around resentment, anger, desperation, or even a romantic-type of love for him, this moment would have been destroyed because I would have reacted and responded emotionally, and would have allowed myself to be engaged in a lengthy conversation. I would have allowed his need to feel like he closed the chapter on ‘us’ or manipulative desire to start a new one overwhelm me. Instead this dialogue lasted no more than 10 minutes (the time it took me to finish eating my sandwich, chips, and most of my drink).

Forgiving him once more was again for me.

I have learned over the years that I am quite capable of walking away, moving on, weeding out people who serve no purpose but to distract me, and doing so lovingly. My high self-esteem is an added benefit, because I know that no matter what I go through and who I go through it with, that there is always someone better out there for me; that God is there watching over me and setting things in motion where I eventfully (through obedience) afterwards end up with bigger, better, and more beautiful experiences each and every time…and this has happened after each and every ‘failed’ relationship- both in business and in my love life.

The only way to truly prepare for bigger, better, and more beautiful experiences and blessings is to unload the weight from anger, guilt, fear, and negativity. We have to drain the venom from our minds and bodies that poisons us and everyone in our path. We have to forgive those who wronged us past and present. If you haven’t done it, if you haven’t let go, release that weight and start living your life fully…today!

Copyright 2011. Natasha L. Foreman. All Rights Reserved.

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