They Call Her “Mother of The Nation”

Beloved…

“Mother of the Nation”…

Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe Madikizela Mandela…the western world knows as Ms. Winnie Mandela, has transitioned from her earthly body today at the age of 81.

Ms. Mandela, may you live eternally in peace.

May other women, both young and more seasoned pick up your torch, stand strong and courageously, determined to never give up or give in until freedom and equity is fully and truly achieved in every sense of their meanings.

Ms. Mandela was and is a force to be reckoned with, that propaganda machines tried to destroy, but failed to do.

Women are to be seen and only heard when called on to speak, and only allowed to say what is deemed respectable and respectful by man. And Black women have less rights than that, especially during the apartheid-era in South Africa.

Some of the culprits have even come forward and admitted their roles and explained that they had to do it to keep her from growing in power and influence; they couldn’t afford having this woman convince her then-husband, Nelson Mandela, to do and say the bold things that would’ve elevated all of South Africa to a status equal to those nations that had colonized and controlled it; they couldn’t risk the domino effect it would create throughout the African continent.

So the propaganda machine worked instead on a strategy of divide and conquer.

They divided the Mandela family.

They divided Black leadership.

They divided the ANC.

They divided a nation.

They almost turned the world against Ms. Mandela.

Almost.

Propaganda machines are fueled by and rely upon the ignorant and uninformed.

However, with every conspiracy there are always the enlightened who you will never fall for the trick and never will convert.

Those of us who see clearly the deception, smoke and mirrors, and the games, also saw the plot against Ms. Mandela.

Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe Madikizela Mandela, we will continue to speak up, speak out, act timely, hold accountable, and demand that all of God’s people live and die with dignity, with the same resources, advantages, and opportunities as those who once and still do oppress them.

You fought an amazing fight Ms. Mandela. You can now rest and watch over your beloved nation. 💗

Here is a snippet of a nice tribute that ABC News created for Ms. Mandela: https://twitter.com/abc/status/980870784833945602?s=21

~Natasha

Copyright 2018. Natasha Foreman Bryant. The Paradigm Life.

Join the This is Human Rights Campaign

In honor of the 65th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the Younger Women’s Task Force (YWTF) had launched our #thisisHumanRights Campaign. From September to December, join us in sharing and posting your photos and videos telling us what human rights mean to you!

Official hashtag #thisisHumanRights!

Follow us on our Facebook, Twitter, Instagram @ywtfatl and Blog to share and learn of all of our upcoming events!

 

 

Natasha Foreman Bryant serves as an advisory board member for the Atlanta chapter of the Younger Women’s Task Force.

HB 141 Support the Human Trafficking Hotline Bill

“Your voice is needed NOW!”
-Georgia Women for a Change

HB 141 Support the Human Trafficking Hotline Bill

1-888-373-7888

Read what Georgia Women for a Change shared today in their latest release about the HB 141 Trafficking Hotline Bill:

Please contact your state representative before 10 am tomorrow morning and ask them to support HB 141 when it comes to the House Floor tomorrow, February 27, for a vote. (Click Here for House Representative Contact information)

Georgia is one of the leaders in the nation when it comes to the trafficking and exploitation of children. HB 141(Lindsey-54th) requires the posting of the National Human Trafficking Hotline number in adult entertainment venues, truck stops, bars, bus stations, airports, emergency rooms, interstate rest areas and other locations where people who are trafficked may be able to call for help or where people who witness something suspicious may call in a tip.

The number is toll-free, confidential and anonymous and operated by a national non-profit that is funded by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services.
1-888-373-7888

The Message: “Please vote YES on HB 141 when it comes to the House Floor for a vote. Children who are exploited or those witnessing potential exploitation need an easy, convenient and fast way to get help or advice. Access to a human trafficking hotline number could save lives.”

We’re so close and we need your help!

Georgia Women for a Change is a non-profit, non-partisan public policy organization that promotes progressive change for women and girls and their families in the state. We welcome women and men who believe that Georgia can do better. We believe that more women in public office will lead to better decision-making. We believe that more women speaking up in our own interest will inform a process that needs our voice

Memorial in Honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr Postponed

Due to the threat of hurricane Irene fast-approaching the memorial dedication in honor of the late, great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr has been postponed until maybe September or October according to the Los Angeles Times.

Read more here: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication postponed – latimes.com.

A Focus on Dignity and Non-Violence at Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy

By Natasha L. Foreman, MBA

On April 15th I was honored to lead a Dignity Day session as a HOPE Corp Volunteer through Operation HOPE (HOPE) at the Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSKYWLA) in Atlanta.

What is amazing is how the majority of this class of ninth graders were initially completely turned off to the idea of having to listen to yet another speaker that day as they were just returning to their classroom from an assembly that focused on the theme of 100 days of Non-Violence…so they were shifty and closed off. But about 15 minutes into our conversation some of the girls who had crossed arms were soon raising their hands and answering questions.

I started off by talking about the concept of legacy and that that day we were laying the foundation and road map for them to create and eventually leave behind a strong, dignified legacy. I had them define the term legacy in their own words and then share some of their dreams, goals and aspirations. Then as our conversation deepened I shared with them the history of how HOPE was founded, the services and programs that HOPE offers, and I started to weave a story where life included them and their legacy.


I think helping them share the names of empowered and dignified women they see in their family, community, and elsewhere who had similar or worse lives growing up helped them to see that they too could be those same type of women- that they are these women but in-training and with the potential to do more and help more in the long run because they are being equipped with the tools at a young age; and our adversity isn’t an excuse to let life pass us by or a crutch to coast through life doing and expecting the bare minimum, but a reason and motivation to excel and succeed.

These young ladies were shocked to hear that the civil rights movement as it pertained to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and Ambassador Andrew Young was sparked, motivated, and pushed along due to their wives Coretta Scott King and Jean Childs Young- two women who endured and overcame adversity and strife. Hearing this information made many of these girls sit up straight in their chairs and listen intently.

                        

When I spoke about not holding grudges, and that forgiving people is not to benefit the person they were forgiving but to help themselves heal, grow, and overcome- some girls shifted in their seats their seats, a few others rolled their eyes in disbelief; but then when I mentioned Oprah Winfrey, Maya Angelou, Iyanla Vandzant and their ability to forgive their abusers and using strife as a launching pad towards success- some of the girls started naming other people like Fantasia and Tyler Perry who was sexually and physically abused and how he also overcame and pushed himself to success.

We discussed the concept of family and that it isn’t just our immediate family we need to be concerned about but our neighborhoods, cities, state, our country, and our global family. Because I know that girls can be equally as cutthroat as boys, I made sure that we had a heart-to-heart chat about trash-talking and “clowning” people and how although initially it can be lighthearted and funny, it can also be crippling and tear apart our “extended” family.

We discussed being relevant not only in this country but globally, and that true wealth (spiritual, financial, etc) can only be maintained long term by leading a dignified life, not by living up to the negative stereotypes that are projected globally about Black females. We discussed self-empowerment and not waiting on the government or specific programs to help us, that we have to help ourselves. That we shouldn’t be waiting for someone else to pick up trash on our sidewalks- we should pick it up ourselves.

We shouldn’t be waiting for someone else to cover the graffiti on our walls and buildings- we should paint over it ourselves; we shouldn’t wait for someone else to beautify our streets and parks with trees and flowers- we should plant them ourselves. I explained that they should be volunteering in their community through church or some other organization taking pride in restoring, building, maintaining, and beautifying their neighborhoods.

We had a pretty good time. We laughed and talked about boys and expectations of being respected by males and all people when you carry yourself with respect and dignity. We discussed the language of money and being financially literate, and how this literacy will empower them. It was refreshing to see that many of them have savings accounts and that two of the students had traveled abroad- one to London and the other to the Bahamas. Two young passport carriers living in an underserved and underrepresented area of Atlanta- doesn’t that give you hope? It gives me hope and encourages me to continue my work in the community, and my work through Operation HOPE.

I hope more men and women find it in their hearts to invest one hour of their time at least once per month to volunteer in a church, in a class room, or in a youth center through Operation HOPE. One person can make a difference!

Copyright 2011. Natasha L. Foreman. All Rights Reserved.
natashaforeman.com
natashaforeman.info
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>The Real Question Concerning Ethiopia

>Today I read an article by Alemayehu G. Mariam who discussed democracy in Ethiopia and whether Ethiopians truly want a democratic society, know what that means to them and their future, and whether the western world is proactive in enforcing human rights while building dignity- or if it is all lip service. I have included excerpts from Mariam’s article below. I only have one word to describe it…DEEP!

Mariam wrote, “I am advised to accept the fact that US human rights rhetoric is primarily intended for international media consumption and to give moral support to the few human rights-minded Ethiopian elites while avoiding the scathing criticisms of the international human rights community for US inaction and hypocrisy. ‘That is realpolitik for you,’ said one of my erudite colleagues jokingly. ‘The US would rather blather about human rights violations to the African masses in the morning only to sit down for a seven-course meal with Africa’s murderers and butchers in the afternoon.'”

“…American policy makers should not be dismissive of ordinary Ethiopians. They should not misinterpret their silence for consent to be brutalised by dictatorship, ” wrote Mariam.

“…It has been argued and anonymously reported in the media that ‘Western diplomats’ in Addis Ababa believe that forceful US action on human rights could create ‘instability’ in the country….But the whole US ‘stability’ subterfuge to do nothing, absolutely nothing, about gross human rights violations in Ethiopia is eerily reminiscent of a shameful period in American history. The principal argument against the abolition of slavery in the US, the ultimate denial of human rights, was ‘stability.'”
                                                                             
Mariam’s correlation between what is and has been taking place in Ethiopia compared to the period of slavery (and post-Civil War) is poignant. 

So what are your thoughts? Read the entire article yourself and let me know.   http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/66294

Copyright 2010. Natasha L. Foreman

Source: 
Do Ethiopians really need human rights?
Steel vices, clenched fists and closing walls (Part II)
Alemayehu G. Mariam
2010-07-29, Issue 492
http://pambazuka.org/en/category/features/66294